Friday, October 28, 2011

Retinal vein blockage

Retinal vein blockage

Retinal vein is the main blood vessel that carries blood from the retina.
Retinal vein blockage causes the veins to swell and smaller winding.
Surface veins become swollen and blood can seep into the retina.

Retinal vein blockage occurs mainly in the elderly who suffer from glaucoma, diabetes, high blood pressure or a condition where the blood becomes more viscous (ie, too many red blood cells).

Retinal vein blockage causes a decrease in vision fungi occurring more slowly than the retinal artery blockage.
Changes that occur in the form of the growth of abnormal new blood vessels in the retina and the occurrence of glaucoma.

Fluorescence angiography can help determine the extent of damage and treatment plan.
To destroy the abnormal blood vessels can be used lasers.

Retinal vein dilation can be done by breathing a mixture of carbon dioxide and oxygen.
In this way the blockage will move down, thereby reducing the area of ​​the retina are affected.

Retinal vein dilation can be done by breathing a mixture of carbon dioxide and oxygen.

In this way the blockage will move down, thereby reducing the area of ​​the retina are affected.

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